Medeya Tsnobiladze, ND, MS

Naturopathic Physician & Acupuncture Specialist located in Fairfield, CT

About Dr. Tsnobiladze

Dr. Medeya Tsnobiladze is an experienced naturopathic physician and acupuncturist. Her particular interest is in conditions that have an impact on the nervous system. She finds that Lyme disease, multiple chronic viral infections, and nutritional imbalances often manifest in neurologic complaints, such as palsies, mental health, and memory and cognition problems, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and demyelinating conditions.

Dr. Medeya’s training came in handy on multiple occasions with her own family. She and her son had been bitten by ticks and diagnosed with Lyme. With the use of a combination of herbal and antibiotic therapies, they were both cured. Throughout the years, natural therapies helped her family members with symptoms of multiple sclerosis, Bell’s palsy, dysautonomia, and others.

While some of these conditions may be incurable, they respond well to naturopathic interventions and patients gain time, function, and most importantly, overall quality of life when they add naturopathic interventions to mainstream protocols.

Dr. Medeya’s initial path to “naturopathic medicine” started long before she knew these words. She was a weak and sickly child. In her first five years of life, she had five pneumonias, persistent respiratory issues and had numerous digestive complaints. She was completely unable to tolerate high fat foods and carbonated beverages.

Desperate to get better, her mother took her every summer to various towns of “mineral waters” where they spent a month there following strict diets, drinking mineral water straight from the sources, and utilized various physical therapy interventions.

All those wonderful treatments were offered at “sanatoriums”, where people lived in a hotel-style rooms, ate at cafeterias that offered multiple therapeutic diets, and had dozens of “treatment rooms” in which they were getting massage therapies, electrophoresis, mud baths, colonic hydrotherapy, nebulizer treatments with essential oils, and many others.

She immensely enjoyed that experience. Something about having a daily routine of drinking salty hot mineral water from specially shaped mugs, walking miles per day, and eating a limited set of products made her feel much healthier by the end of each visit. After five yearly visits, by the age of 10, she was completely cured, emerging as a strong and resilient kid who had energy to participate in sports and many extra-curricular activities.

The medicine that saved her was just “medicine” without any “naturopathic” or “integrative” modifiers. Doctors at sanatoriums and clinics prescribed drugs, ordered regular labs, EKGs, and imaging studies, but also performed colonic hydrotherapies, selected therapeutic diets, ordered appropriate sets of exercises, and selected mineral water protocols. That complex approach was the best Soviet medicine could offer. That was the best medicine she knew. In America, it fit best into the “integrative medicine” approach, and she is as committed to it now as she was at 10 years old of age.

During her time at PhD in Neuroscience program at Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, she also worked with a clinical team developing treatments for people who survived prolonged cardiac arrest and strokes and saw that both pharmaceutical and natural substances have impact on restoration of neurologic functions. During her time at the program, is where she first developed her interest in working with patients.

While still in Russia, she also began her passion for Chinese medicine by taking Tai Chi classes five days a week. Tai Chi helped her to heal compression fractures that led to years of back pain. As University of Bridgeport had an Acupuncture institute that allowed for enrollment with the ND program, it was only natural for her to enthusiastically complete a dual degree. Through first-hand experience, she adds these additional tools in clinical care.

As a trained biophysicist with love of biochemistry and deep interest in neurology, she looks forward to working with patients presenting with the most complex neurologic problems.

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,  Office of Medeya Tsnobiladze, ND, MS

Dr. Medeya Tsnobiladze is an experienced naturopathic physician and acupuncturist. Her particular interest is in conditions that have an impact on the nervous system. She finds that Lyme disease, multiple chronic viral infections, and nutritional imbalances often manifest in neurologic complaints, such as palsies, mental health, and memory and cognition problems, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and demyelinating conditions.

Dr. Medeya’s training came in handy on multiple occasions with her own family. She and her son had been bitten by ticks and diagnosed with Lyme. With the use of a combination of herbal and antibiotic therapies, they were both cured. Throughout the years, natural therapies helped her family members with symptoms of multiple sclerosis, Bell’s palsy, dysautonomia, and others.

While some of these conditions may be incurable, they respond well to naturopathic interventions and patients gain time, function, and most importantly, overall quality of life when they add naturopathic interventions to mainstream protocols.

Dr. Medeya’s initial path to “naturopathic medicine” started long before she knew these words. She was a weak and sickly child. In her first five years of life, she had five pneumonias, persistent respiratory issues and had numerous digestive complaints. She was completely unable to tolerate high fat foods and carbonated beverages.

Desperate to get better, her mother took her every summer to various towns of “mineral waters” where they spent a month there following strict diets, drinking mineral water straight from the sources, and utilized various physical therapy interventions.

All those wonderful treatments were offered at “sanatoriums”, where people lived in a hotel-style rooms, ate at cafeterias that offered multiple therapeutic diets, and had dozens of “treatment rooms” in which they were getting massage therapies, electrophoresis, mud baths, colonic hydrotherapy, nebulizer treatments with essential oils, and many others.

She immensely enjoyed that experience. Something about having a daily routine of drinking salty hot mineral water from specially shaped mugs, walking miles per day, and eating a limited set of products made her feel much healthier by the end of each visit. After five yearly visits, by the age of 10, she was completely cured, emerging as a strong and resilient kid who had energy to participate in sports and many extra-curricular activities.

The medicine that saved her was just “medicine” without any “naturopathic” or “integrative” modifiers. Doctors at sanatoriums and clinics prescribed drugs, ordered regular labs, EKGs, and imaging studies, but also performed colonic hydrotherapies, selected therapeutic diets, ordered appropriate sets of exercises, and selected mineral water protocols. That complex approach was the best Soviet medicine could offer. That was the best medicine she knew. In America, it fit best into the “integrative medicine” approach, and she is as committed to it now as she was at 10 years old of age.

During her time at PhD in Neuroscience program at Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, she also worked with a clinical team developing treatments for people who survived prolonged cardiac arrest and strokes and saw that both pharmaceutical and natural substances have impact on restoration of neurologic functions. During her time at the program, is where she first developed her interest in working with patients.

While still in Russia, she also began her passion for Chinese medicine by taking Tai Chi classes five days a week. Tai Chi helped her to heal compression fractures that led to years of back pain. As University of Bridgeport had an Acupuncture institute that allowed for enrollment with the ND program, it was only natural for her to enthusiastically complete a dual degree. Through first-hand experience, she adds these additional tools in clinical care.

As a trained biophysicist with love of biochemistry and deep interest in neurology, she looks forward to working with patients presenting with the most complex neurologic problems.


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